• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site
vision

Publications

Academic inbreeding and publication activities of Russian faculty

The literature on the consequences of academic inbreeding shows ambiguous results: some papers show that inbreeding positively influences research productivity measured by the quantity and quality of publications, while others demonstrate the opposite effect. There are contradictory results both in the studies of different countries and within countries. This variety of results makes it impossible to transfer the findings from one academic system to another, and in Russia this problem has been under-explored. This paper focuses on the relationship between inbreeding and publication activity among Russian faculty. The research was conducted using data from the ‘Monitoring of Educational Markets and Organizations’ survey. The results show that there is no significant effect of academic inbreeding on publication productivity: no substantial and robust differences in publication activity between inbreds and non-inbreds have been found. The paper finishes with a discussion of possible explanations inherent in the Russian academic system.

… 
Tertiary Education and Management. 2018.
Oct 31, 2017

Acculturation and Identity

Cultures are never static. Cultures change and evolve in response to a number of factors and in a bidirectional way they also change individuals even as individuals change cultures as a consequence of globalization, rapid urbanization and industrialization in many countries and settings. Some of the cultural characteristics and inherent traits in individuals are more pronetochangesthanothers.Theimpactofoneculture on another depends upon a number of factors, such as the purpose of such contact degree and the duration of this contact. If one culture invades another for political and economic reasons, the outcome is likely to be different and may lead to deculturation than if the contact is through media at a distance where changes may be slow rather than sudden. Berry, in this chapter, defines acculturation as a process of cultural and psychological change in cultural groups, families and individuals following intercultural contact. Cultural identity refers to the ways in which individuals establish and maintain connections with, and a sense of belonging to, various groups. Embedded within cultural identity are microidentities of the individual such as gender, religion, sexual orientation etc. some of which can be hidden and others are obvious. The processes and outcomes of these processes are highly variable, with large group and individual differences. This chapter focuses on describingsomeoftheseprocesses,thestrategiespeople use to deal with them, and the adaptations that result. Three questions are raised: how do individuals and groups seek to acculturate? How well do they succeed? Are there any relationships between how they go about acculturation and their psychological and sociocultural success? Berry notes that the commonest strategy is integration (defined as preferring to maintain one’s cultural heritage while seeking to participate in the life of the larger society), rather than assimilation, separation or marginalization which is likely to be most adaptive.   … 
In bk.: Textbook of cultural psychiatry. Iss. 2. Cambridge University Press, 2018. P. 185-193.
Nov 19, 2017

A credit risk model based on contour subspaces for decision support systems in loan granting

Credit risk management is of considerable importance for banks, and the most common credit risk models are based on combining client’s private information with credit terms. However, if credit terms are an integral part of initial calculations, then results have to be recalculated for every alteration of credit terms. Thus, banks obtain ‘one-shot’ results from decision support systems that are built with application of these models. In the given paper a credit risk model is proposed. This model is based on a separate analysis of client’s private information and credit terms in order to construct a contour subspace for credit terms that correspond to an equal credit risk value. Application of a proposed model will add advanced options for decision support systems in loan granting, i.e. to visualize a contour subspace of credit terms for a client according to an individual creditworthiness estimation, provide options to choose credit terms from this contour subspace, and manage credit terms on-line according to the dynamics in a creditworthiness estimation.

… 
In bk.: Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems. Proceedings of SAI Intelligent Systems Conference (IntelliSys) 2016. Vol. 2. L.: Springer, 2018. P. 783-793.
Nov 19, 2017

Aggregation of Forecasts and Recommendations of Financial Analysts in the Framework of Evidence Theory

The article is dedicated to the method of aggregation of financial analysts’ recommendations in the framework of the evidence theory. This method considered on the example of Russian stock market and the quality of the obtained results was compared with the classical consensus forecast. It is shown that the combination rules, which are widely developed in the theory of evidence, allow aggregating the recommendations of analysts taking into account the historical reliability of information sources, the nature of the taken decisions (pessimism-optimism), the conflict between forecasts and recommendations, etc. In most cases it turned out that, obtained aggregated forecasts are more accurate than consensus forecast.

… 
Kutynina E., Lepskiy A.
In bk.: Advances in Fuzzy Logic and Technology 2017. Vol. 642. Cham: Springer International Publishing AG, 2018. P. 370-381.
Oct 5, 2017

Ambiguous Homecoming: Retribution, Exploitation and the Return of Repatriates to the USSR, 1944-46

In 1944-46, five million Soviet citizens returned from displacement to the USSR. They had been forced labourers, refugees from conflict, and prisoners of war in occupied Europe. As they returned, all faced official scrutiny and some were arrested, but the majority of Soviet repatriates went home and not to the Gulag. Repatriation was not an episode of mass repression perpetrated by an all-powerful state. Instead, recently declassified archival collections demonstrate that Soviet administrators and police could hardly keep track of returnees. In the absence of strong state control, the crucible of return was in the relationships between repatriates and soldiers, local bosses, and neighbours. The chaos at the end of the war combined with the popular assertion that repatriates were guilty of collaboration with German occupiers made them attractive targets for abuse. Aspects of this story depended on specifically Stalinist practices, yet repatriation was not uniquely Stalinist insofar as it generated problems found in other incidents of mass displacement, particularly in the aftermath of the Second World War. Rather than exclusively a creation of the Soviet system, the often harrowing experience of return was largely a by-product of war. … 
Past and Present. 2018.
Oct 19, 2017

Analysis of education reforms in Latvia, Estonia, and Russia: Common histories, divergent paths

Educational reforms is often aimed at building social cohesion or aligning one part of an education system with another. School curriculum reform is one possible way for disseminating what society would like to be taught in every school in a country. However, merely the introduction of reforms is not enough if they would not come true in schools’ day-to-day process. On a country level, the data on what is taking place in schools are usually difficult to relate with what was proposed by the reforms, especially with attainment. Using a natural experiment situation, this chapter describes the process of curriculum reform in Russian-medium schools in Latvia and Estonia. The research question focuses on whether those curriculum reforms were successful from the perspective of schools interiorization of new curriculum and PISA performance improvement. Using the three-layered curriculum (intended, implemented, and attained curriculum) approach, this study analyses how the intentions from the laws and other reform-related documents were implemented in everyday school practice and are reflected in attained educational results. For addressing this issue, a series of in-depth interviews in Russian-medium schools, in conjunction with the PISA 2003-2012 trends analysis, were conducted. The results showed that intended and attained curricula have become closer in both countries. Schools actively implement proposed teaching, and PISA performance has been constantly increasing, showing that the attained curriculum is approaching what it is intended to be, though this process is different in the two countries.

… 
In bk.: Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Symposium Publishers, 2018.
May 21, 2017

Application of Fuzzy Asymmetric GARCH-Models to Forecasting of Volatility of Russian Stock Market

This paper presents the results of volatility forecasting for indices of the Russian stock market using existing and developed by the authors fuzzy asymmetric GARCH-models. These models consider various switching functions which are taking into account the positive and negative shocks and are built using the tools of fuzzy numbers. Furthermore, in some models there are used switching functions that consider expert macroeconomic information. It was shown that fuzzy asymmetric GARCH-models provide a more accurate prediction of volatility than similar crisp models.

… 
Lepskiy A., Suevalov A.
In bk.: Proceedings of the Second International Scientific Conference “Intelligent Information Technologies for Industry” (IITI’17). Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing. Vol. 679. Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2018. P. 286-294.
Oct 5, 2017

Automated generation of testing questions on the basis of error annotations in EFL essays: a time-saving tool?

The presented paper introduces a valuable tool for EFL instructors to select the direction for creating custom-made learning materials, namely, using a learner corpus with errors annotated by experts for the purpose of administering to the target group of learners a custom-made test which has been automatically generated from the sentences with student errors. The paper describes the stages in test-making and the statistics from automatically generated tests administered to students of the School of Linguistics (HSE).

… 
In bk.: Learner Corpora and Language Teaching. Gießen: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2018.
Nov 8, 2017

Automated Word Sense Frequency Estimation for Russian Nouns

According to G. K. Zipf’s observation, there is a strong correlation between word frequency and polysemy. Yet word sense frequency distribution is a neglected area in computational linguistics. Furthermore, the study of sense frequency has theoretical interest and practical applications for lexicography and word sense disambiguation. Although WordNet and SemCor contain some information about sense frequency in English, it is not enough for either practical or research purposes. This information is even lacking in Russian. To fill this lacuna, we developed and tested an automated system based on semantic vectors, which deals with the problem of sense frequency for Russian nouns. The model is first trained unsupervised on large corpora and then supplied with contexts and collocations from the Active Dictionary of Russian. The dictionary examples are used either for supervised post-training or for automatic labeling of clusters that are learned unsupervised. This allows us to reach a frequency estimation error of 11-15 percent on different corpora without additional labeled data. Word sense frequency distributions for 440 nouns are available online.

 

 

… 
Lopukhina A., Лопухин К. А., Носырев Г. В.
In bk.: Quantitative approaches to the Russian language. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, 2018.
Oct 11, 2016

Can the leniency program deter collusion in young competition jurisdiction of transition economy?

The paper fills the gaps between the scale of application of leniency program (LP) almost in every competition jurisdiction in the world and the concentration of the effect assessment on developed countries only. An empirical assessment of LP introduced in Russia in 2007, under imperfect antimonopoly provisions on collusions showed the effects of the changes in the rules of antitrust enforcement on the behaviour of market participants. I test the hypotheses of the impact of LP enforcement on the characteristics of collusion (types of agreement, duration and number of participants). I show that the first version of LP in Russia (2007) made antitrust enforcement less effective and accordingly reduced collusion detection. However, the reform of LP in 2009 provided the positive results. Even in very imperfect institutional environment, the improved version of LP (2009) has impact on collusion participants: less stable collusions are destroyed and potential collusions do not appear.

… 
Yusupova G. F.
International Journal of Economic Policy in Emerging Economies. 2018.
Jan 27, 2017

Competition Law: Analysis, Cases and Materials

The fourth edition of this book has been entirely re-written, this time co-authored by Ioannis Lianos with the contribution of Paolo Siciliani. It includes substantially more material on the economics of competition law and integrates, for the first time, UK competition law materials and commentary. An additional new feature is greater introductory and analytical commentary, making this book suitable for use either as a stand-alone text and materials book, or as a book of materials to be used in conjunction with a second text. It will continue to be one of the best books for undergraduate and post-graduate students in competition law, providing them with the necessary critical understanding of the law, its social and economic context, and the necessary depth of analysis in order to provide them with the knowledge and tools they need for practising competition law. The materials have been completely updated to take into account recent developments in EU and UK competition law, including extracts from the leading cases of Cartes Bancaires, Intel, Lundbeck, Streetmap v Google, the most recent versions of the Block Exemption Regulations and the Europan Commission's and the UK Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) Guidance, recent UK and other National Competition Authorities (NCA) cases in digital markets, the recent European Commission's investigations against Google (Alphabet), recent merger cases and guidance and a detailed analysis of enforcement (including private enforcement, criminal enforcement and Alternative Dispute Resolution) and procedure in both the EU and UK competition law. The book also includes commentary on the implications of Brexit in competition law enforcement in the UK. Economic analysis is presented in a non-technical way so as to enable students without any background in economics to understand the economic content of the law and to be able to critically assess economic evidence often presented in competition law cases. The book is co-authored by an economist and constitutes the only textbook/casebook in the market with a balanced incorporation of both law and economics. Other sources of wisdom for competition law, such as economic sociology and business studies, are also referred to and analyzed. The bulk of the text is made up of analysis supplemented with extracts from Commission Decisions and decisions of NCAs (in particular the UK ones), Opinions of the Advocates General at the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) and judgments of the CJEU and General Court. These are supplemented by extracts from EU legislation, and comments, notes and questions prepared by the authors for each important judgment or decision so as to enhance students' understanding of the economic and legal context of the specific case.

… 
Lianos I., Korah V., Siciliani P.
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018.
Oct 13, 2017

Competition Policy: Between Equity and Efficiency

The efficiency approach, as advocated by the Chicago School in particular, only provides a very narrow approach to competition law analysis that relies on the preferences of consumers. This approach remains especially insufficient for the regulation of firms that provide citizens with politically relevant news and information. In times of digitisation, citizens increasingly rely on news disseminated by Internet intermediaries such as Facebook, Twitter or Google for making political decisions. Such firms design their business models and their algorithms for selecting the news according to a purely economic rationale. Yet recent research indicates that dissemination of news through social platforms in particular has a negative impact on the democratic process by favouring the dissemination of false factual statements, fake news and unverifiable conspiracy theories within closed communities and, ultimately, leads to radicalisation and a division of society along political and ideological lines. Experience based on the Brexit referendum in the UK and the recent presidential elections in the US highlights the ability of populist political movements to abuse the business rationale of Internet intermediaries and the functioning of their algorithms in order to win popular votes with their ‘post-truth politics’. This article relies on competition law principles to discuss future approaches to regulating the market for political ideas at the interface of competition law and media law in the new digital age. Based on constitutional considerations the article rests on the assumption that media markets should not only provide news that responds best to the psychological predispositions and subjective beliefs of the individual citizen, but also provide correct information and diversity of opinion as a basis for making informed democratic decisions. … 
Lianos I., Gerard D.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018.
Oct 13, 2017